Wordishness


  1. Why I Love Fringe, Vol. I:

Towards the end of season one, there is an episode (“The Road Not Taken”) where Peter and Olivia meet a conspiracy nut (played by sci-fi mainstay and one-time Star Trek guest star Clint Howard).

In the scene, Howard’s character claims he is Spock from the planet Vulcan, and that a “time-traveling rogue Romulan” is trying to start a war with the United Federation of Planets.

My points?

That’s fairly funny. But it’s even better when you realize that this is the exact plot of Fringe creator J.J. Abrams’s Star Trek movie (2009), and that the number of the character’s apartment is “1701.”
It’s better still when you realize that  this episode aired before that movie opened, at a time when the plot was still a tightly-guarded secret.
The crowning touch for me was when I noticed that Fringe music composer Michael Giacchino (who also scored Star Trek) inserted four or five notes from one of the recurring motifs in his Star Trek soundtrack under this bit where Peter gives the Vulcan Salute to Howard’s character.
I don’t know whether to be ashamed or pleased that I noticed all of this.
So, basically: nerdgasm.

    Why I Love Fringe, Vol. I:

    Towards the end of season one, there is an episode (“The Road Not Taken”) where Peter and Olivia meet a conspiracy nut (played by sci-fi mainstay and one-time Star Trek guest star Clint Howard).

    In the scene, Howard’s character claims he is Spock from the planet Vulcan, and that a “time-traveling rogue Romulan” is trying to start a war with the United Federation of Planets.

    My points?

    1. That’s fairly funny. But it’s even better when you realize that this is the exact plot of Fringe creator J.J. Abrams’s Star Trek movie (2009), and that the number of the character’s apartment is “1701.”

    2. It’s better still when you realize that this episode aired before that movie opened, at a time when the plot was still a tightly-guarded secret.

    3. The crowning touch for me was when I noticed that Fringe music composer Michael Giacchino (who also scored Star Trek) inserted four or five notes from one of the recurring motifs in his Star Trek soundtrack under this bit where Peter gives the Vulcan Salute to Howard’s character.

    4. I don’t know whether to be ashamed or pleased that I noticed all of this.

    So, basically: nerdgasm.